Air

BARWON FREEDOM from FLUORIDATION: A consumer and professional action group in the Geelong region, acting to end the unfair, undemocratic and unsafe practice of water fluoridation.

The human race is facing two major crises: climate change, and human toxicity from pollutants.

Since industrialisation, air pollution has rapidly increased. Unfortunately, this is a real problem in big cities and industrial areas. Some types of air pollution come from evaporation, others from attrition (things grinding or wearing down). Most come from combustion. Heating units, power plants, incinerators, and industry are major sources of air pollution, but the number one cause is vehicle exhausts.

The air we breathe

A 12-mile-thick layer wrapped around our planet, the atmosphere consists of about 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and 1% argon, helium, carbon dioxide, and other gases. It also harbours a fair amount of water vapour and an unwarranted amount of pollution. As this mixture is inhaled into the lungs, about a fifth of the oxygen is retained while the rest is exhaled along with carbon dioxide and water vapour.

The air we breathe is a mixture of gases including nitrogen, oxygen, water, argon, carbon dioxide and trace gases. Each day we inhale around 14,000 litres (14 m3) of air as we take about 26,000 breaths (that's equivalent to about 150 full bathtubs). If this air contains pollutants, we inhale them into our bodies and they can affect our health. So to protect people's health and the environment, we need to keep the air clean and free from pollution.

GEELONG FLUORIDE EMISSIONS

Source NPI 2006 Emission Total kg/year
Basic Non-Ferrous Metal Manufacturing [ 272 ] 110,000
Petroleum Refining [ 251 ] 32,000 
Basic Chemical Manufacturing [ 253 ] 14,000
Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing [ 276 ] 2,800
Fuel Combustion - sub reporting threshold facilities * 1,200
Cement, Lime, Plaster and Concrete Product Manufacturing [ 263 ] 160
Solid fuel burning (domestic) * 13
Electricity Supply [ 361 ] 1.1
Liquid fuel burning (domestic) * 0.36
Barbeques * 0.26
Total Emissions (kg/year) 160,000
Outdoor Pollution
Since industrialisation, air pollution has rapidly increased. Unfortunately, this is a real problem in big cities and industrial areas. Some types of air pollution come from evaporation, others from attrition (things grinding or wearing down). Most come from combustion. Heating units, power plants, incinerators, and industry are major sources of air pollution, but the number one cause is vehicular exhaust.

Symptoms caused by outdoor pollution.

Effects of air pollution include eye irritation, respiratory symptoms and diseases, headaches, dizziness, shortness of breath, sore throat, chest pain, and nausea. The risks of major illness, all respiratory diseases, and colds go up. Susceptible persons may die during smog alerts. In addition to hurting people and animals, smog can kill plants and trees, and damage stone, metal, and fabrics.

Coping with outdoor air pollution

During a smog alert it is best to stay indoors, where there is about 50% less smog. Use air conditioners and recycle indoor air. Get more rest and sleep. Avoid cigarettes and unnecessary driving. If you live in the city, the early morning hours usually have the cleanest air. It is also a good idea to take advantage of clear days by getting outdoors. The best way to escape air pollution is to live in the country.

Indoor Air Pollution

Sources of indoor pollution With the awareness of the energy crisis, one of the adaptations in society was to "weatherize" homes. Tighter living quarters decrease the exchange rate between inside and outside air. Weatherizing is good for keeping the heat in, but it also keeps in polluted air. Natural-gas ovens, hair sprays, disinfectants, cleaning materials, wall paint, floor wax, cigarette smoke, radon, insecticides, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, particle-board construction, new furniture, and carpets are but a few of the sources of the fumes, gases, and particles that are emitted inside our homes. Solutions to the problem fall into three categories:

Indoor pollution solutions

The best solution is the removal or alteration of the problem at its source. For example: replace unvented kerosene heaters with electric heaters; quit smoking; et cetera.

The second solution is to increase the ventilation, which involves the sacrifice of some energy efficiency. One solution to this problem is to not overheat your home in the first place and to put on more clothing. One should keep several windows around the home open a few inches to ensure that a good supply of fresh air is in circulation and that the bad air can get out. Bacteria, molds, fungi, house mites, and other disease-producing organisms have a hard time multiplying in rooms that are kept well-aired and sunned.

The third move toward cleaner air indoors is the use of air-cleaning machines. There are various kinds—electrostatic, charcoal filtration, and negative ionization. Each may have its place in today's polluted world. Each has its advantages and disadvantages (electrostatic and negative ionization may emit some ozone.) Do your own research before you invest. Is the unit big enough to do the job? Is the expense warranted?

Symptions of indoor air pollution

How do you know if you have an air pollution problem inside your home? The symptoms may include headache; dizziness, cough, irritation of the eyes, nose, and/or throat, runny nose, difficulty in breathing, chest and/or abdominal pain, nausea, difficulty sleeping, diarrhea, and rashes. Only certain individuals may be affected. Since this list of symptoms contains some rather common complaints, a physician should be consulted.

The Air We Breathe

A 12-mile-thick layer wrapped around our planet, the atmosphere consists of about 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and 1% argon, helium, carbon dioxide, and other gases.

It also harbours a fair amount of water vapour and an unwarranted amount of pollution. As this mixture is inhaled into the lungs, about a fifth of the oxygen is retained while the rest is exhaled along with carbon dioxide and water vapour.

The air we breathe is a mixture of gases including nitrogen, oxygen, water, argon, carbon dioxide and trace gases.

Each day we inhale around 14,000 litres (14 m3) of air as we take about 26,000 breaths (that's equivalent to about 150 full bathtubs). If this air contains pollutants, we inhale them into our bodies and they can affect our health. So to protect people's health and the environment, we need to keep the air clean and free from pollution.

Dental fluorosis

Moderate FluorosisOkay, okay ... so this might not be an 'official' health department warning, YET! But it is certainly the warning that should be issued by NSW Health, along with Dr John Carnie at the Victorian DHS and embattled Health Minister Daniel Andrews.

The above picture with the brown stains is 'moderate Dental Fluorosis', the tooth disorder caused by using fluoridated drinking water in childhood plus possible other sources of fluoride in the environment or diet.

REMEMBER - dental fluorosis is the tip of the iceberg, a biomarker indicating systemic fluoride poisoning on Dental Fluorosis at the FAN website.

Fluoride Action Network website

Kidney Damage

Fluoridated water may damage the health of people with kidney disease, the USA National Kidney Foundation (NKF) now admits in its new position paper published in April 2008. Meanwhile, Kidney Health Australia and Dr John Carnie at the Victorian DHS are digging their heels in and pretending that the health danger does not exist.

The 2006 USA National Research Council review of toxicology of fluoride in drinking water presented some alarming conclusions about subgroups in the population who are more at risk from ingestion of fluoride, even at relatively low fluoride levels in water. One of these subgroups is kidney patients, those with stage 5, 4 or even less advanced stages of chronic kidney disease.

Read more here

Bone Fractures

Fluoride & Bone - Skeletal Fluorosis:

Excessive exposure to fluoride causes an arthrtiic bone disease called skeletal fluorosis.

Skeletal fluorosis, especially in its early stages, is a difficult disease to diagnose, and can be readily confused with various forms of arthritis including osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

In the advanced stages, fluorosis can resemble a multitude of bone/joint diseases, including: osteosclerosis, renal osteodystrophy, DISH, spondylosis, steomalacia, osteoporosis, and secondary hyperparathyroidism.

The risk of developing fluorosis, and the course the disease will take, is influenced by the presence of certain predisposing factors, including impaired kidney function; dietary deficiencies; gastric acidity; and repetitive stress.

Click for more information

Brain Damage

The Discovery

Research published in 2001 showed that fluoride (F) deposits in the pineal gland with age and is associated with enhanced gland calcification. Eleven aged cadavares were dissected and their pineal glands assayed: "There was a positive correlation between pineal F and pineal Ca (r = 0.73, p<0.02) but no correlation between pineal F and bone F. By old age, the pineal gland has readily accumulated F and its F/Ca ratio is higher than bone.

Reference

Bone Cancer

Re: Dr Carnie claimed that fluoride consumed through fluoridation has virtually no side-effects for anyone, and that the study by Dr Elise Bassin (2006) linking the bone cancer osteosarcoma with fluoride consumpton, is of no concern for Victorian citizens.

Any reader of this website, or the USA's National Research Council (2006) report on 'fluoride in drinking water' is aware that these claims are ridiculous and fly in the face of the best available science.

Click here for the Parliamentary Committee transcript of 1st December 2009 in which Carnie made these unsupportable claims in reply to questions from Mr Peter Kavanagh former MLC for Western Victoria.xt

Skin Rashes

CHRONIC FLUORIDE TOXICITY SYNDROME

Four recent reviews, from the United States of America (1,2), Australia (3) and New Zealand (4), have concluded that claims that fluoride is an allergen could not be supported from studies undertaken to date, and that the weight of evidence shows that fluoride is unlikely to produce hypersensitivity and other immunological effects.Although the two US subcommittees involved were different, the sections dealing with the effects of fluoride on hypersensitivity and the immune system are almost the same.

Thus although all four reports reached a similar conclusion that fluoride was unlikely to produce allergic or hypersensitivity effects, the 1993 reports (2,4) refer to those published in 1991 (1,3) and are not completely independent.

Click to read paper